May 15, 2016

Make Time for NVW 2016

Posted in Best Practice, Celebrations, Recognition of Volunteering, Valuing Volunteers tagged , at 3:51 am by Sue Hine

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I am going to be out of the country when National Volunteer Week happens in New Zealand.  I shall be in places that are not country members of IAVE (International Association for Volunteer Effort) – though I have no doubt there is a lot of volunteering going on.  So I shall Make Time now to do some promoting for the event, and to take a good look at that theme of Making Time.

Let’s find out first what National Volunteer Week is all about.  It was a Canadian invention, according to this bit of history.  Back in 1943, this was a week to celebrate efforts made to the war effort by women on the home front.  After a post-war decline it got revived in the 1960s and spread in popularity to the United States, to become from 1974 an annual Presidential Proclamation.  In this first year, President Richard Nixon declared a National Volunteer Week to be dedicated to those who give their time to charity:

“I urge all Americans to observe that week by seeking out an area in their community in which they can give to a needy individual or worthy cause by devoting a few hours, or more, to volunteer service.”

By this decree National Volunteer Week becomes the original call to Make Time, as well as recognising and celebrating the efforts of volunteers.  It is now a feature on the calendar for UK, Australia and New Zealand organisations.

Volunteering New Zealand introduces its 2016 campaign as a call for action:

Lack of time is the most commonly cited reason why people don’t volunteer, both in NZ and internationally. We believe that for volunteering to flourish, and the various benefits of volunteering to be realised, people are increasingly going to need to make time, now and into the future.

Complaints about recruitment difficulties have been going on for years.  In recent times being ‘time poor’ is a continuing refrain, along with organisations reporting ‘can’t get the skills we need’, and ‘can’t get people to stay on’.  And yet, statistics from various sources (and various methodologies) indicate around one third of our population make time to volunteer, and the people who volunteer the most, arguably those in the midst of child-rearing and career commitments, are those in the 30-39 age cohort.

Of course we cannot literally create more time.  But look how we have learned to squeeze more into each day, to pursue not just household management and holding down paid employment and getting our share of a good night’s sleep.  We make time to watch TV, play sport, socialise with friends, and even to read a book.  Adding in a slice of volunteering is, like those activities, a matter of choice.

Choosing to volunteer can come from a cultural obligation, a passion for a cause, a belief in community, a need to belong, and simply because you want a diversion from your day job – as well as those drivers like looking for work experience, learning new skills and for learning about the local community and its resources.

And if volunteers do make that choice, if they do Make Time, they want it to be worthwhile.  So organisations have to up their game, offer ‘bespoke’ volunteer opportunities, positions tailored to the interests and skills of the volunteer.  Requests for short-term assignments are a challenge for organisations accustomed to the forever-volunteer, requiring adjustment to training schedules, planning for continuity as well as constant change.  Paid staff working with volunteers need to Make Time to identify volunteer opportunities and to be creative in how volunteers could be engaged.

And paid staff will also need to Make Time to establish relationships with volunteers, to orient them to their work, and to provide support if necessary.  If you say you just don’t have the time then you will miss a whole lot of added value that volunteers can bring to your daily work.  And you might even miss finding the volunteer who could save you a whole load of time.

So to keep volunteers Making Time, adopt these words to show your appreciation for what volunteers can do:

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And thank you for Making Time to read this blog.

 

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4 Comments »

  1. Thanks Sue for this great reminder: “Paid staff working with volunteers need to Make Time to identify volunteer opportunities and to be creative in how volunteers could be engaged.”
    If we expect volunteers to make time to help our organizations, then we need to make the time to ensure they are fully engaged, and that includes everyone in the organization, not just the volunteer services department. Thanks for this!

    Like

  2. Absolutely! Susan J. Ellis had it right when she published her book, “From the Top Down” in 1986! I’m not a math major, but that’s 30 years ago.
    We need to keep chipping away and perhaps, we are preaching to the choir here. We should probably be targeting CEO’s and charity boards.

    Like

    • Sue Hine said,

      Cheese-makers in New Zealand like to say “Good things take time” – but I keep on asking ‘why is universal recognition of volunteering taking so long?”

      Like


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