March 3, 2013

The Fruits of Our Labours

Posted in A Bigger Picture, Best Practice, Management of Volunteers Project, Professional Development, Valuing Volunteers tagged , , , , , at 3:15 am by Sue Hine

harvest-and-preserves-23441280255023VyNQMarch is the month for the beginning of autumn in my southern hemisphere, though current sunshine levels have not yet arrived at the ‘season of mists and mellow fruitfulness’.  We are getting close however, to harvesting a project begun more than three years ago.  In a couple of months Volunteering New Zealand will publish the Learning and Development Pathway, a guide to professional development for managers of volunteers.  This document will sit alongside the Best Practice Guidelines for volunteer-involving organisations.

The need for skilled and competent managers of volunteers has been a universal catch-cry for decades, alongside attaining due recognition and appreciation for the work entailed in enabling volunteers to play such a huge role in delivering community services.  We are not alone in raising the concerns we have in New Zealand.

The project started from a vision that Managers/Leaders of Volunteers should be valued, well-resourced and competent professionals.  Research and stories of experience was showing managers of volunteers were (and are) struggling for recognition and for resources for professional development.   The flow-on effect was that volunteers may not get the best possible experience from their work, thus impacting on job satisfaction and recruitment, and not least on the services they provide in community organisations.  We were also keen to put paid to the self image of being just a volunteer or just a volunteer manager, phrases which carry the imputation of lesser value than others in the organisation.

What took us so long – in getting to start the project, and then three years of consultation and debate?  The original cry was Enough! following a Volunteering New Zealand conference.  Then we engaged in a collective debate to determine goals and lots of sharing skills and knowledge.  It was an empowering process, encouraging people to respond to the challenges and to think about breaching some of the barriers.  Good things take time, and given the diversity of volunteering and community organisations it was important to discuss plans as widely as possible.

Of course getting a learning pathway to publication stage is not the end of the mission.  Follow-up promotion will be needed, pressing for acceptance and action on recommended practice.  There are plenty of opportunities to meet a range of training needs, but maybe some persuasion will be needed for organisations to see the benefits of supporting professional development – through fee reimbursement or paid study leave, for example.  Managers of volunteers who may be reluctant to take on formal study, can note they could gain credits via Assessment of Prior Learning (APL).

So what will we be seeing in a year’s time?  At the very least, there will be wide-ranging conversations about recognition and training for managers of volunteers.  At the very least, organisations could be acknowledging the relevance and importance of their volunteer programmes, and considering how to enhance them.

Whether by small steps or big strides Volunteering New Zealand has started something that could end up being a whole lot bigger.

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1 Comment »

  1. claireteal said,

    Thanks for a great blog, Sue! It’s great to think back over the past few years and realise how far we’ve come 🙂

    Like


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